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Oil cooling.

Practicedummy

Pinball Author Apprentice
Speaking of cooling, I am thinking of buying an Antec (Antec 300 black steel mid ATX) case where the power supply is mounted on the bottom (my power supply has long enough cabling to reach all the connections). Will this help as far as cooling goes by having the power supply on the bottom? The case has a 140mm on the top 2 120mm fans on the front, one on the side and one on the back, all of them high velocity.
Here's the link if you are curious: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042
 

mrschultz

Inserted Coin
Speaking of cooling, I am thinking of buying an Antec (Antec 300 black steel mid ATX) case where the power supply is mounted on the bottom (my power supply has long enough cabling to reach all the connections). Will this help as far as cooling goes by having the power supply on the bottom? The case has a 140mm on the top 2 120mm fans on the front, one on the side and one on the back, all of them high velocity.
Here's the link if you are curious: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042
I think the advantage to that is the CPU is up near the top where those 2 fans can take the hot air out without either one being blocked by the power supply.

I've seen these type cases with a grill on the bottom so you can put the power supply in upside down so the supply can get outside air from under the case. I wouldn't do that for fear of too much dust being pulled in off the floor, but if you had a dust free home....
 
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Practicedummy

Pinball Author Apprentice
Thanks mrshultz for the input, I will be buying the case soon then! A grill on the bottom of the case? Never seen one like that. :D
 

Ike Savage

Froggy like robot
Staff member
Site Supporters
> At the many pizza places i worked at as a teen we never had our ovens
> any hotter than 500. Any good pizza stone will be able to take that temp easily.


and the point of the stone is to increase the temperature, so in effect you're cooking at significantly higher than 500 heat.
btw, i think my answer may violate the laws of thermodynamics. my understanding of physical science is poor, but isn't it impossible for an object to achieve a higher temperature than its surroundings? i mean, if it's not undergoing a chemical reaction.

so what is a preheated stone doing? storing up the heat and moving it faster than the oven rack / oven air can do, maybe.
 

mrschultz

Inserted Coin
btw, i think my answer may violate the laws of thermodynamics. my understanding of physical science is poor, but isn't it impossible for an object to achieve a higher temperature than its surroundings? i mean, if it's not undergoing a chemical reaction.

so what is a preheated stone doing? storing up the heat and moving it faster than the oven rack / oven air can do, maybe.

I was going to say something about that earlier but wasn't sure if you were talking about a pizza oven or a stone in a standard oven. The reason you have to pre-heat the stone is because it absorbs heat slower than the rest of the oven, if you put the pizza on the stone as soon as the oven hits it's set point the stone will be cooler than what the oven thermometer reads.

In a pizza oven I'm sure the stone bottom is hotter than the air since it's the stone that is being heated directly. I guess if you put a stone down close to the element in a standard electric oven it would have a similar effect, but you would probably get wild swings in temp as the element turned on and off.
 

Ike Savage

Froggy like robot
Staff member
Site Supporters
okay, and i guess that's why the article linked earlier mentioned pre-heating the oven for an hour. (to fully saturate the pizza stone / firebrick with heat)

one cheat i used to use before i had a pizza stone was to put a freshly-made crust in a pizza pan and cook it just enough to firm up, then remove it from the pan, add toppings and put the result directly on an oven rack.

i'm pretty psyched to try some pizza experiments when i get back. in particular i'm going to try replacing the cheese (for cholesterol concerns) with something, anything that can give similar texture and tanginess. right now i'm thinking about a soy cheese and nutritional yeast mixture. i had a kashi frozen pizza the other day that tried to replace the cheese with a cannelini bean spread, but the results were underwhelming.
 

mrschultz

Inserted Coin
okay, and i guess that's why the article linked earlier mentioned pre-heating the oven for an hour. (to fully saturate the pizza stone / firebrick with heat)
An hour seems overkill but I guess if you were using full size fire bricks it would take that long, I would think 15 or 20 minutes would be plenty for one inch thick bricks. That is the time after the oven reaches setpoint, so maybe their oven was slow getting up to it's setpoint making the total time one hour.
 

Ike Savage

Froggy like robot
Staff member
Site Supporters
hmm, i guess i'll have to experiment with the heating times to find out when they get saturated. maybe start with 20 minutes, work up to an hour, and see if there are any differences.

short of drilling a hole midway into one of the bricks and sticking a meat thermometer in. :p
or looking up densities / composition, finding the right formulae, and... ugh.
 
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